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Sovereign’s Birthday and New Year Honours

The most common Orders of Chivalry awarded to citizens of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines by the Sovereign are The Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George and The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire. They are awarded twice a year on 1 January (New Year Honours) and on the Sovereign’s official birthday (Birthday Honours). The Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George is the older of the two.

The Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George

The Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George was founded on 28 April 1818 by George, Prince Regent, later George IV, while he was acting as Prince Regent for his father, George III. It is named in honour of two military saints, St Michael and St George.

The Order of St Michael and St George is awarded to men and women who render extraordinary or important non-military or loyal service and consists of the Sovereign and a Grand Master, positions currently held by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, and His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent respectively, and of 3 classes in order of precedence:

1. “Knights Grand Cross” and Dames Grand Cross” (GCMG)

2. “Knights Commander” (KCMG) and “Dames Commander” (DCMG)

3. “Companions” (CMG)

The insignia of the Order are as follows:

The Collar, worn around the neck is only given to Knights and Dames Grand Cross. It is a gold chain which consists of pieces in the forms of crowned lions alternating with white Maltese Crosses and with the cyphers SM and SG. At the front of the chain, and also at the back, is an Imperial Crown, under which are two gold images of winged lions.

The Star, which is only worn by Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights and Dames Commander, includes the Cross of St George, in the centre of which is an image of the St Michael holding a flaming sword and standing on Satan. The image is within a blue circle bearing the motto of the Order, Auspicium Melioris Aevi (Token of a Better Age), in gold letters. The aforementioned Cross and image are on a figure of seven silver rays, with small gold rays between each pair of silver ones, for Knights and Dames Grand Cross, and on a figure of four silver rays for Knights and Dames Commander.

The Badge is a fourteen-pointed white Cross. In the centre of one side is an image of the St Michael holding a flaming sword and standing on Satan. In the centre of the other side is an image of St George slaying a dragon. Each image is surrounded by a blue circle bearing the Motto of the Order in gold letters. Above the Badge is an Imperial Crown. By the Knights Grand Cross and Dames Grand Cross it is worn suspended from the Collar, by Knights Commander and Gentlemen Companion it is suspended on a riband of blue with a central red stripe worn around the neck, by Dames Commander on a bow worn on the left shoulder, and by Ladies Companion on a bow suspended from the neck.

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire was first instituted as an Order of Chivalry by King George V by Letters Patent dated 4 th  June 1917, to honour the thousands of people who helped to win the First World War but were not soldiers. It is the newest amongst the Orders of Chivalry, and since its institution Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has made subsequent alterations to the Statutes of Ordinances of the Order. The Order also awards a Civil or Military Order, called the British Empire Medal (BEM), to persons who render meritorious service.

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire also consists of the Sovereign and a Grand Master, positions currently held by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, and His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh respectively, and of five classes as follows in order of precedence:

1. “Knights Grand Cross” and Dames Grand Cross” (GBE)

2. “Knights Commander” (KBE) and “Dames Commander” (DBE)

3. “Commanders” (CBE)

4. “Officers” (OBE)

5. “Members” (MBE)

Each of these five classes contains two sub-divisions: the first is styled “Military” for members of all the armed forces and the second, “Civil”, and each of these sub-divisions is composed partly of Ordinary and partly of Honorary Members. The Order also awards a Civil or Military Order, called the British Empire Medal (BEM), to persons who render meritorious service.

The Insignia for Commanders, Officers and Members of the Order is a silver gilt or silver badge worn pendant from a rose pink riband edged with pearl grey attached to the left breast of the jackets or outer garment of men, or tied in a bow on the left shoulder by women.

The British Empire Medal for both men and women consists of a circular medal in silver worn on the left side suspended from a clasp ornamented with oak leaves attached to a rose pink riband edged with pearl grey.

Nomination Procedures

Requests for nominations from Buckingham Palace are received by the Governor-General in June and January for the forthcoming New Year Honours and the Birthday Honours, respectively. The British Monarch, as Sovereign of both Orders, appoints all members on the advice of the Government. The number of persons appointed in each class and division of the Orders are set out in their respective Statutes, which explains the quota system usedto give these awards on an annual basis.

Meaning of Post Nominals for the Honors and Awards held by the Governor-General

 

The meaning of the post nominals below for the honours and awards conferred upon the Governor-General, Sir Frederick Nathaniel Ballantyne, are given in order of precedence:

GCMG : Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael & St. George

MD : Medical Doctor (Physician/Cardiologist)

DSc : Doctor of Science

Guidance on the Wearing of Insignia of Honours and Awards

The Insignia of Honours and Awards exist in two forms – for men and for ladies – in two sizes – full and miniature. Full size insignia are presented to recipients at the time of investiture. Recipients have the option to purchase miniatures at their own cost.

The insignia are worn at all State events, or when the host of the event considers it appropriate to do so. This is indicated by inserting at the bottom of the invitation card the words “Medals/Decorations”.

The following general guidance covers many of the common questions about the wearing of Insignia of Honours and Awards with civilian dress. Different rules may apply to the wearing of Insignia by members of the uniformed services and such persons should be guided by their service regulations or standing orders.

  • Insignia should be worn when the dress code on the invitation card indicates “Medals/Decorations”.

  • Full-size insignia should be worn at daytime functions and miniature insignia at evening events (after 6 p.m.).

  • Breast Stars & Badges are worn on the lower left breast. Holders of two breast stars/badges should wear the more senior one immediately above the junior star but always below the line of the breast handkerchief pocket.

  • Broad Sash Ribands are worn over the appropriate shoulder with the bow falling immediately below the opposite hip. Broad ribands are not worn over dinner jackets.

  • Neck Badges and Broaches are worn by men under the shirt collar so that the top of the badge hangs 2 cm (3/4 inch) below the knot and in front of the tie. The equivalent badge for ladies is a broach worn on the left breast. A person with two or more neck badges or broaches, for example, GBE and KCMG, should wear only one neck badge, normally the senior one (GBE) unless the occasion is specifically related to the junior Order.

  • Medals are worn on the left breast, approximately in line with the decorative buttonhole on the upper lapel of the coat. Where more than one medal is worn, the order of precedence is from the centre outwards to the shoulder. The medals should be worn close together with the ribbons just abutting and, ideally, mounted on a medal brooch or bar.

  • A person with a neck badge (or broach) and a medal may wear both.

  • Miniature insignia are worn on the left breast, never at the neck.

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